Triton Oxygen Mask for Diving

Divers who share this will always see more fish in their dives

    007 James Bond dives into the waters but doesn’t surface for a long time. He doesn’t have a scuba unit on him. So how he can do this?

    In Thunderball and Die Another Day movies, James Bond uses a great gadget! A small rebreather that can extract oxygen dissolved in the water.

    You can also see such a rebreather in Star Wars!

    But is it possible to breath from such a small device underwater in today’s technology?

    Meet With Triton Oxygen Mask

    A Korean student, Jeabyun Yeon, has designed such a device. It is called a “Triton Oxygen Mask.

    Although it is not a “mask,Triton is told to be a revolutionary gadget that will let people discover the underwater life without even using a scuba tank and a regulator.

    Idea behind the Triton Oxygen Mask (I will call Triton Rebreather) is simple.

    It acts like an artificial gill. On these “gills,” there are holes smaller than water molecules that help the oxygen molecules to enter the system.

    A very small compressor is used to compress the oxygen collected and stores it in a tank.

    This micro compressor is energized by a micro battery.

    User just “bites” the Triton mouth piece (just like the ones in our snorkels and regulators 2nd stage).

    Can Triton Rebreather Really Work?

    This is the point. Triton is a good design that gives hope to everyone who is dreaming to dive without any other equipment needed.

    On deepseanews.comDr. Alistair Dove wrote a great article about the feasibility of Triton rebreather.

    According to Dr. Alistair Dove, humans breath 500 mls of air when inhaled.

    As we know, oxygen is the 21% of the air we breath. When we exhale, 16% of this oxygen is gone. So, we only consume 5% of the oxygen when we breath.

    It makes about 25 mls or 0.025 liters of oxygen.

    Avogadro’s Law tells us that one mole of any gas is 22.4 liters.

    If 22.4 liters is one mole, 0.025 liters is 0.00111 moles. So in every breath, we take 0.00111 moles of oxygen.

    One mole is oxygen (o2) weighs 32 grams.

    So, 0.00111 * 32 makes 0.03552 grams of oxygen. Simply, it is 35.52 milligrams.

    Even a high oxygenated ocean surface can have 6 milligrams of oxygen per liter.

    Which means that;

    Triton rebreather should be filtering 35.52/6=5.92 liters of water.

    An average person breaths 15 times per minute while resting.

    5.92*15=88.8 liters per minute.

    For filtering 88.8 liters per minute and let you breath enough oxygen even in a rest mode, Triton needs a 1/4 horse power pump.

    Without having such a pump, Triton breather will only work if you swim so fast.

    However, if you swim too fast to be able to gain oxygen that will be enough for you for 15 breaths per minute, you’ll be breathing more than 15 times per minute because you’ll move so fast and your breath rate will increase.

    It is just like a running rabbit trying to catch the carrot in front of it but tied to its tail.

    You can read Dr. Alistair Dove’s article here.

    Summary

    Triton rebreather seems to be a great design and a very cool idea.

    In fact,  Jeabyun Yeon is a designer, not an engineer who is working on underwater gadgets.

    Although Triton rebreather is told to be a unique device, it is still impossible for us to use it in our dives.

    So for now, Triton rebreather (Triton Oxygen Mask for Diving) is just at its project phase.

    Hope to see it working one day.

    That would be great, wouldn’t it?

    Photo resource: 

    http://www.yankodesign.com/2014/01/03/scuba-breath/

    Divers who share this will always see more fish in their dives

      Comments

      1. That’s the most accurate thing I’ve ever read about this Triton Rebreather , well done sir!

      2. What about using an under water scooter to keep your breath rate from increasing?

        • Hello there Lex,

          Thanks for visiting.

          Well, even the fastest scooter on the Earth cannot help us with this.

          Maybe after a couple of tens of years, tech will develop and Triton Oxygen Mask will work.

          Who knows? 🙂

          Have safe dives.

      3. Zenith Star says:

        What about using larger side tubes for pulling gas from the water? More surface area means less need to move water over them, no? I could see them wrapping around the head and down the back, where a normal tank might be mounted. DARPA is developing hydrofoils which work more efficiently at propelling a human underwater than traditional fins. A battery and pump that fits in a book sized pack on the back, not on your face, plus perhaps a small tank for mixing exhaled air with fresh oxygen (not sure how easy that in particular is to do with carbon dioxide being toxic and all) seems like it would make this concept much more viable.

      4. How can I buy a Triton Oxygen Mask For Diving in Toronto, Canada?

        • You can’t own and dive without a scuba unit not only in Canada but on the whole planet, Steve.

          Because Triton O2 Mask is just a unique design. Nothing more.

          Wanna dive and explore the underwater? Search for a dive center in Canada and get your certification 😉

          Hope this helps.

      5. Lampshade says:

        You reference an article by Alistare Dove on deepseanews.com about the Triton, and call it a “great article,” yet Alistare accurately rips the entire concept of the Triton to shreds. (http://www.deepseanews.com/2014/01/triton-not-dive-or-dive-not-there-is-no-triton/)

        Here are some interesting points about the design that should make anyone skeptical:
        1. The “microfilter” is designed to exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide molecules with the water without allowing water through. This is interesting, as a water molecule (H2O — two tiny hydrogen atoms, and one large oxygen atom) is smaller than either oxygen (O2 — two large oxygen atoms) or carbon dioxide (CO2 — two large oxygen atoms AND a carbon atom) molecules.
        2. Those are bicycle handle grips.
        3. As any diver knows, the pressure at 15 feet (the lowest depth of the Triton) is 50% greater than that at sea level. A diver’s lungs will be compressed by a third at that depth, and without another few liters of air (more than can be held in a single breath by that liquid oxygen canister), the diver’s chest cavity will be so compressed that they wouldn’t be able to breathe out. Something has to supplement the partial pressure of the oxygen, even if it can make it through the microfilter which won’t let smaller water molecules pass. Where is this pressure coming from?
        4. The oxygen density in water is much lower than that of air. Creatures which use gills instead of air-exchanging lungs must pass huge volumes of water through their gills to maintain minimum oxygen levels in the blood. They also exchange water in those gills, but since blood is mostly water, that’s ok for the fish.
        5. One has to breathe OUT to get rid of carbon dioxide from the blood. Where does that air go? Does the nitrogen (N2 — still larger than H2O) go through the filter, too? In the Triton video, large bubbles come out when the diver exhales, which means that these gasses aren’t able to be reintroduced into the water. One might think that such a transfer rate from the filter is impossible at the speed of an exhale… which would be at nearly the same speed as an inhale, for which the filter is fast enough?
        6. Anyone who has looked into the science of closed circuit rebreathers knows that air-exchanging lunged animals can only exchange a small amount of oxygen and carbon dioxide with each breath. A volume of air measuring in the range of 1 to 7 liters (at a pressure equal to that at depth) must move out of and back into a human’s respiratory system with each breath to get that small amount of oxygen needed (and to rid itself of the CO2). A large rebreather does this by capturing the entirety of an exhaled breathe in a bladder, supplementing more air for the depth, removing CO2 with a relatively large filter, and supplementing a tiny portion of oxygen. There is no air bladder on the Triton. Where does the air go? Where does the new air come from? And this happens for up to 45 minutes?

      6. RandallB says:

        This is something every snorkeler should be interested in. If I didn’t have to come up for air from 10-15 feet deep every 1-2 minutes that would be glorious! I had invested in this product on “Indiegogo” but the Triton Team didn’t keep up their updates so I was refunded my investment money. I would gladly reinvest my money into Triton !! I am handicap so this product would be a God send for shallow dives for me. Thank you for reading my ramblings !!

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